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Angela

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Angela last won the day on November 14

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  1. As #COP26 drew to a close, it's important the momentum doesn't end. This conference was an opportunity to initiate discussions and drive collaborative action - let's keep the ball rolling. I've made a short highlights reel of my time at #glasgowcop26 - filled with talks, the green zone and the #climate march. MashedVideo_1636629546076.mp4
  2. The blue skies were welcomed by the early delegates making their way across the city centre to join the climate change conference on its third day. Today marked discussions around finance in the Green Zone, with talks on gender, pensions and under-represented voices who are often left behind in financial climate debates. From the beginning, a recurring theme was voiced; the detriment of overlooking one of the greatest assets in helping us in the race to net-zero – women. Irish Independent Politician, Mary Robinson said “we can’t afford to squander the potential of half our population
  3. The looming target to meet net-zero by 2050 means there is an increasing pressure to decarbonise our energy systems. According to BEIS, heat in buildings is one of the biggest sources of greenhouse gas emissions in the UK, accounting for 23% of total UK emissions. If we apply the right skills and technology, as part of a collaborative approach, we will be able to minimise these emissions, if not completely eradicate them with a shift in how we produce energy. BEIS have found that heat networks currently provide approximately 2% of UK heat demand. The Climate Change Committee estimated in
  4. The looming target to meet net-zero by 2050 means there is an increasing pressure to decarbonise our energy systems. According to BEIS, heat in buildings is one of the biggest sources of greenhouse gas emissions in the UK, accounting for 23% of total UK emissions. If we apply the right skills and technology, as part of a collaborative approach, we will be able to minimise these emissions, if not completely eradicate them with a shift in how we produce energy. BEIS have found that heat networks currently provide approximately 2% of UK heat demand. The Climate Change Committee estimated in
  5. The University of Cambridge has found that energy generation in the UK is responsible for over 50% of total UK CO2 emissions (37% from centralised power generation and 14% from domestic heat generation from fossil fuels). If we were to shift our current energy model to an integrated and decentralised energy system these figures would drop dramatically, if not completely. Harnessing green technology within energy production is essential to meeting net-zero by 2050. Instead of a siloed approach, using one or two means of energy production e.g. traditional gas and coal, a decentralised energ
  6. Plan plan plan Plan your meals Plan your food shop Plan your portions Use your freezer Q) Is something about to go off? A) Shove it in the freezer! Q) Are there lots of leftovers? A) Shove it in the freezer! Q) Did you cook too much? A) Shove it in the freezer! Eat the peels and skins Apples, pears, potatoes, carrots, courgettes, tomatoes - can you think of anymore? https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/articles/food_waste_free
  7. "It takes 132 million tonnes of coal to produce 60 billion kilograms of textiles" (Textile World). If the fashion industry doesn’t change the way it currently operates, it is on track to increase its contribution to global emissions by 50 per cent by 2030. The Carbon Trust reports that clothing accounts for around 3% of globally produced carbon emissions. By 2030, on current trends, emissions from production are set to rise 60 per cent, reaching an estimated 2.8 billion tonnes of CO23. The use of freight transport by the fashion industry is set to triple by 2040.
  8. With the continually increasing textiles demand and population growth, the fashion industry’s carbon footprint will only continue to increase. The sector’s emissions are predicted to rise by more than 60% by 2030, if steps towards a sustainable fashion industry fails to happen now. Setting an industry-wide renewable energy target at 60% by 2030 would encourage a 39% reduction of emissions, this can be infiltrated within the fashion industry worldwide. Hard coal and natural gas are heavily relied on in the textiles industry to generate electricity and heat for processing. Dominant ma
  9. Who knew clothes were so energy intensive? Yet, surely it's inevitable as one of the biggest industries worldwide? How exactly does fashion contribute towards a carbon footprint? As clothes are manufactured, they need to be transported globally to retailers and consumers; widespread transportation of clothes and textiles therefore leads to increased pollution. Top facts about the fashion industry's impact on the environment Only 1/4 of all waste textiles in the west are reclaimed, the remainder goes to landfill, where they contribute to methane emissions t
  10. It's a less known fact that wasting food is bad for the environment, particularly the climate. Food waste that ends up in landfills produces a large amount of methane – a more powerful greenhouse gas than even CO2. This methane contributes towards the excess amounts of greenhouse gases which traps heat in the atmosphere to increase the devastating impacts of change. According to OLIO, we waste about a third of all food  produced for human consumption. Food requires incredible amounts of fresh water, land and labour to produce, so when it is wasted - what was it all for? If it were a coun
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